Acupuncture

Atherosclerosis and Traditional Chinese Medicine

June 15, 2022

Skye Sturgeon, DAOM, Quality Assurance Manager, Mayway

Photo of man holding his chest in pain Heart disease remains the number one cause of death in the United States and worldwide, closely followed by cancer, and then COVID-19. In this article, the risk factors of coronary artery disease will be described as well as the mechanisms that define how the condition progresses with a focus on atherosclerosis. In addition, there will be an explanation of how traditional Chinese medicine approaches a differential diagnosis and which herbal strategies may assist in supporting individuals who are coping with this condition.

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77.18 Shen Guan and Three Emperors – Master Kidney Point

June 14, 2022

Susan Johnson, L.Ac.

“Shen Guan” means Kidney Gate. This is Dr. Tung’s master Kidney point (77.18), and there is no more powerful point for the Kidney. It tonifies not only the Kidney, but also the Spleen and the Yin, and benefits Qi.

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Men's Health: Male Factor Infertility

June 1, 2022

William Maclean, M.Sc. Chin. Med.

The incidence of male factor infertility is believed to be increasing in the Western world. In Chinese, the word for sperm and essence is the same (jīng 精 ), that is, they have the same origin and are inextricably linked. According to Chinese medicine, the quality of sperm and its ability to fertilize an ovum is intimately linked to the health of the Kidneys and requires a number of factors to converge. 

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Case Study: Kidney Yang Deficiency or Liver Yang Rising?

May 28, 2022

Skye Sturgeon, DAOM, Quality Assurance Manager, Mayway

Older Stressed Man

Acupuncturist Skye Sturgeon reviews a case study of a 68-year-old male whose chief complaint was cold feet, intermittent low back pain, and chronic tinnitus. Traditional Chinese medicine treatment plan is defined along with acupuncture points.

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Endometriosis: Support from Chinese Medicine

May 10, 2022

Denise Cicuto, L.Ac.

Photo of woman with abdominal pain Endometriosis affects 10% of people who menstruate every year, and that’s just the people who get a formal diagnosis. Endometriosis a very painful menstrual condition in which the uterine lining (endometrium) grows and bleeds outside the uterus in “adjacent pelvic organs such as ovaries, fallopian tubes, pelvic ligaments, vagina, sigmoid colon, rectum, ureters or bladder.” In rare cases, it may be found outside of the pelvic area. The causes of endometriosis are still unknown and it is a condition that may be experienced by any menstruating person, regardless of gender expression. In this article, we discuss endometriosis from a Chinese medicine perspective and discuss methods for TCM treatment.

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Overactive Bladder: a TCM Perspective

May 9, 2022

Dr. Kim Peirano, DACM, L.Ac.

Photo of woman hiking Overactive bladder (OAB) is a condition that affects adults and children worldwide and can be caused by various underlying factors or traumas like childbirth, prostate enlargement, poor pelvic floor muscle control, bladder prolapse, and more. It is obvious that this condition can create a significant psychological burden on patients and symptoms range from urinary urgency to incontinence. While this condition can be incredibly bothersome, surgery often seems a drastic approach and medications may have limited results and side effects. Acupuncture is an incredibly effective treatment for OAB, working better than most pharmaceutical medications and with fewer adverse effects.

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An Integrated Approach to Caring for Patients with Hyperemesis

May 8, 2022

Raven Lang, L.Ac., O.M.D.

Photo of pregnant woman

Raven Lang shares a story about a patient of mine with hyperemesis. I share this story to point out that there are times when a practitioner must realize the limits to what can be done with TCM treatments and that, at those times, it is necessary and prudent to quickly ask for additional help.

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Chinese Medicine Treatment of Rhinitis

April 25, 2022

William Maclean, M.Sc. Chin. Med.

Rhinitis

Rhinitis, whether seasonal or perennial, is usually an allergic condition. In TCM terms we relate this concept to deficiency of wei qi. The wei (or protective) qi has its basis in Kidney yang and is distributed by the lungs to all the surfaces of the body.

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TCM Heat and Inflammation

March 24, 2022

Skye Sturgeon, DAOM, Quality Assurance Manager, Mayway

Chinese Medicine Heat and Inflammation Latent heat (潜热 qiánrè) as a Chinese medicine concept has ancient origins dating to the Huangdi Nei Jing and the Shang Han Lun, first appearing in Chapters 3 and 5 of the Su Wen. It was used to explain how the exposure of a Cold pathogen, believed to occur in winter, changed to Heat in the spring. Latent Heat has developed into a useful concept to explain how Internal, Organ, or Blood Heat can arise without obvious disease proceeding through the Four Levels or Six Stages.

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Master Tung's Magic Points & Cupping in the Aftermath of the Coronavirus

March 22, 2022

Susan Johnson, L.Ac.

Susan Johnson Cupping Treatment

Many acupuncturists are gradually reopening their practices. At the same time, a second wave of COVID-19 is sweeping through the country as people are becoming impatient with sanitation protocols and social distancing. Even while we have compassion for the hardships that the pandemic has created, it is ever more important to safeguard ourselves and our clinics and not let our guard down just because we wish to believe that the crisis is over. This article discusses Cupping and Master Tung points for promoting wellness along with protecting yourself and your practice.

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Understanding How Qi Gong Promotes Health

March 21, 2022

Skye Sturgeon, DAOM, Quality Assurance Manager, Mayway

Qi GongBreathe your way to harmony, balance, health, and well-being. Practicing Qi Gong yourself and teaching it to your patients is one of the most beneficial aspects of Chinese medicine. It can be engaged anywhere and by anyone, including those who are bed-ridden or in a wheelchair. In Qi Gong breathing, the action is focused on the exhale by intentionally contracting the diaphragm and abdominal wall muscles, squeezing out the carbon dioxide until the lungs are empty.

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The Primary Pathological Triad

March 19, 2022

William Maclean, M.Sc. Chin. Med.

The primary pathological triad is three patterns of pathology that frequently occur simultaneously, are tightly interlinked and mutually engendering. The triad comprises Spleen yang qi deficiency, Liver qi stagnation, and Heat of some type, usually Damp Heat or Heat derived from constrained qi. In addition to the basic triad of pathology, there may be further complication by Blood and/or yin deficiency, Blood stagnation, shen disturbances, and Phlegm.

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Women’s Voices in Traditional Chinese Medicine

March 8, 2022

Laura Stropes, L.Ac.

Women's Voices in TCM

We are celebrating women's health and the fabulous contributions that women are making in traditional Chinese medicine! Check out our interviews with Yvonne Charles of Charlotte Maxwell Clinic, Valerie Hobbs, L.Ac., specializing in women's health and former midwife, Susan Johnson, L.Ac., respected author and instructor of Master Tung's points, Sally Rappeport, L.Ac., acupuncturist and co-founder of the Shen Nong Society, and Ravyn Stanfield, Executive Director of Acupuncturists Without Borders.

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Wind and Cold Damp Bi

January 26, 2022

Skye Sturgeon, DAOM, Quality Assurance Manager, Mayway

Wind and Cold Damp Bi

One of the most common reasons that patients seek treatment from licensed acupuncturists is for musculoskeletal aches and mild pain (Tòng 痛), both acute and chronic. There may also be decreased range of motion, inflammation, swelling, and numbness. Primarily, these issues are due to minor injury or dysfunction of joints and related soft tissues, including tendons and ligaments. In traditional Chinese medicine, this often is interpreted as Obstruction Syndrome (Bì zhèng 痺症).

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Moxa Strengthens the Kidneys and Mingmen Fire

January 3, 2022

Susan Johnson, L.Ac.

Moxa is an excellent way to deeply warm the body, more important now, as we head into fall and winter. In fact, between the change of seasons, there is a two to four week period referred to as “Moxa Season.” During this interval, it is said that the “Life Gate is open.” 

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