C-19

Herbal Medicine during the Pandemic

January 30, 2023

Bill Schoenbart

Graphic of chinese herbs in piles

With great appreciation, Bill Schoenbart, associate chair of the Department of Herbology at Five Branches University, shares his clinical expertise of treating hundreds of Covid-19 patients over the last 3 years. Bill shares common patterns he has seen along with five case studies including how the TCM treatment plans evolved as the diagnosis changed partnered with recommended formulas to support those cases.

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Recovery Formulas for “Lingering Evil Qi”

January 26, 2023

Skye Sturgeon, DAOM, Quality Assurance Manager, Mayway

Exhausted Woman

Skye Sturgeon, L.Ac. explores strategies that are designed for the restoration of healthy functioning from Fú xié after a patient has tested seronegative for SARS Cov-2. These patients no longer suffer from COVID-19, but require various remedies to tonify the Qi, Yin, and Blood, and dispel the Lingering Evil Qi to provide for the free flow of Qi that promotes health and normal homeostasis.

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Cold Weather Kidney Tonics

January 4, 2023

Mark Frost, MSTCM, L.Ac.

Cold Weather Kidney Tonics Winter is upon us and the cold winds have begun to blow once again. This is an ideal time to strengthen and tonify the Kidneys in order to ensure the Yang Qi is warming the interior, channels and collaterals. The TCM functions of the Kidneys include storing the Essence, governing fluid metabolism in the lower burner and lower extremities, receiving the Qi from the Lungs, ruling the two lower orifices, regulating reproductive and sexual function, and housing the Life Gate (Ming Men – 命門) Fire. We review our top 3 cold weather kidney tonics and their use in Chinese medicine. Read More

Moxa Strengthens the Kidneys and Mingmen Fire

December 25, 2022

Susan Johnson, L.Ac.

Moxa is an excellent way to deeply warm the body, more important now, as we head into fall and winter. In fact, between the change of seasons, there is a two to four week period referred to as “Moxa Season.” During this interval, it is said that the “Life Gate is open.” 

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Gan Mao Ling & Yin Chiao/Qiao – What’s the Difference?

December 2, 2022

Laura Stropes, L.Ac.

Gan Mao Ling & Yin ChiaoMany practitioners wonder what the differences are between these two very popular formulas to prevent and treat common wind-heat invasion. One main difference is that Yin Qiao is exclusively for wind-heat invasion, whereas Gan Mao Ling, likely due to its ability to strengthen the immune system, can also be used for the initial stages of wind-cold. Therefore, Gan Mao Ling may be safely taken by a patient before a determination is made as to the etiology of an early stage wind invasion, as well as for short term prevention of a wind invasion. However, if Gan Mao Ling does not work in the first couple of days...

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Fires and Metal: Fall Lung Formulas

October 2, 2022

Laura Stropes, L.Ac.

Smoky HillsAutumn is the season of metal, and pertains to the Lung and Large Intestine organs. It is the season of dryness in Chinese medicine, and as we have experienced here in California, it is also the season of wildfires. With colder weather coming, burning leaves and smoking chimneys can cause patients across the country to react to the change in air quality.

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Lung and Throat Protecting Soup

September 29, 2022

Janet L. Borges, MSTCM, Dipl. AC & CH (NCCAOM), L.Ac.

Lung Protecting Soup

Figs are one of the oldest cultivated crops throughout the world, and often said to be a symbol of peace, abundance and prosperity. Dried figs hold a special place in this delicious fall recipe, with heat clearing and moistening properties. Entering the Lung, Large Intestine and Stomach meridians, figs can promote the secretion of saliva to soothe a sore throat and dry cough, as well as being supportive to the functions of digestion and elimination.

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Deep Dive on 3 Lung Formulas

September 27, 2022

Mark Frost, MSTCM, L.Ac.

Lung FormulasIn TCM terms, we say the Lung is the “tender organ” because it is directly exposed to the environment via the respiratory process and in its role in regulating the exterior. A wide variety of external factors can affect the Lung, including the five environmental factors of Wind, Cold, Heat, Dampness and Summerheat, as well as miscellaneous factors like pollen, animal dander, smoke, and environmental pollution. In this article, Mark Frost provides a deep dive on three important formulas that address specific Lung pathologies seen in clinical practice.

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Strengthening Children's Resistance to Illness

August 28, 2022

Mark Frost, MSTCM, L.Ac.

Formulas for Kids

As the summer gives way to fall and the lingering challenges posed by the current pandemic remain, we as parents and practitioners are naturally focused on protecting our children's health and well-being. Whether our concerns focus on the usual seasonal illnesses, or more specifically on COVID-19, the foundations of strengthening our children are the same. Naturally, prevention is our first line of defense, and the public safety guidelines already in place bode well for significantly lessening children's sick days from the usual seasonal colds and flu.

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Cordyceps Cs-4: A Sustainable Alternative

August 27, 2022

Skye Sturgeon, DAOM, Quality Assurance Manager, Mayway

Mycelium

According to Traditional Chinese Medicine principles, Dōng chóng xià cǎo gently tonifies the Kidney Yang and augments Jing/Essence, nourishes the Lung Yin, supports the protective Qi, transforms Phlegm, and assists in stanching blood in the Lung from Yin deficiency. Cordyceps is a rare herb in that it is harmonizing of both Yin and Yang. Some attribute this to its origin in the earth-bound underground caterpillar larva and its fruiting body ascending towards heaven.

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Protect them with Jade Windscreen

August 24, 2022

Mark Frost, MSTCM, L.Ac.

Yu Ping Feng San Jade WindscreenFor countless generations, Jade Windscreen (Yu Ping Feng San) has been utilized to address surface deficiency patterns that lead to aversion to wind and frequent invasions of common pathogenic influences. These complaints are the result of surface deficiency due to deficient or unregulated Wei Qi. The etiology of Wei Qi deficiency are manifold and determined by a comprehensive differential diagnosis. The most common causes of deficient Wei Qi include Lung, Spleen and Kidney deficiency patterns.

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Autumn Equinox Soup

August 22, 2022

Yvonne Lau, President of Mayway

Harvest Fig Soup

As we begin to prepare for Autumn and Winter, it is important to nourish the Metal element by adding more Yin foods to protect us from the dryness of the season. Plus, we LOVE figs! Figs are one of the oldest cultivated crops throughout the world, and are often said to be a symbol of peace and abundance. Entering the Lung, Large Intestine and Stomach meridians, figs can promote the secretion of saliva to soothe a sore throat and dry cough, as well as being supportive to the functions of digestion and elimination. Pork, which is neutral, sweet and salty, also moistens dryness and benefits the Spleen, Stomach and Kidneys.

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Herbalist Corner: Medicinal Mushrooms

August 21, 2022

Mark Frost, MSTCM, L.Ac.

Herbalist Corner: Medicinal Mushrooms

Mark Frost, L.Ac., from the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine in San Francisco, highlights 3 medicinal mushrooms: Reishi (Ling zhi / Ganoderma), Shiitake (Xiang gu), and Maitake (Hui shu hua). While all three are known for their traditional Chinese medicine use benefiting qi, blood, and overall health, Shiitake and Maitake are also common culinary herbs.

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Herbalist Corner: Suan Zao Ren & Bai Zi Ren

July 7, 2022

Mark Frost, MSTCM, L.Ac.

Herbalist Corner VideoMark Frost, Herbal Chair at American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine (ACTCM) joins Mayway to highlight 2 important herbs in the Calm Spirit Category. Suan Zao Ren and Bai Zi Ren are discussed including their TCM functions and how to select the best herb for your patients. Read More

Anxiety: The Unsettled Shen

July 5, 2022

Mark Frost, MSTCM, L.Ac.

Bu NaoFrom the view of traditional Chinese medicine, several emotions make up what we presently describe as anxiety. On close examination four emotions stand out as comprising what we call anxiety. According to TCM theory, the emotions of fear, pensiveness, grief and anger cause the Qi to sink, stagnate, dissipate, and rise respectively.

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