Herbs & Formulas

Recovery Formulas for “Lingering Evil Qi”

April 1, 2021

Skye Sturgeon, DAOM, L.Ac., Quality Assurance Manager, Mayway

Exhausted Woman

Skye Sturgeon, L.Ac. explores strategies that are designed for the restoration of healthy functioning from Fú xié after a patient has tested seronegative for SARS Cov-2. These patients no longer suffer from COVID-19, but require various remedies to tonify the Qi, Yin, and Blood, and dispel the Lingering Evil Qi to provide for the free flow of Qi that promotes health and normal homeostasis.

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Ci Wu Jia for Vitality and Recovery

March 30, 2021

Mark Frost, MSTCM, L.Ac.

Eleuthero Capsules

Mark Frost discusses Ci Wu Jia, also known as Eleuthero and “Siberian Ginseng.” Ci wu jia is classified as a Qi tonic. Its nature is spicy, slightly bitter, and warm, entering the Spleen, Heart and Kidney meridians.

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Herbalist Corner - Yu Zhu & Bei Sha Shan

March 22, 2021

Mark Frost, MSTCM, L.Ac.

Herbalist Corner Yu Zhu and Bei Sha Shen video

Mark Frost, Herbal Chair at American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine (ACTCM) joins highlights 2 important herbs that Nourish the Yin. Yu Zhu and Bei Sha Shen are compared including their TCM functions and how to select the best herbs for your patients.

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3 Spring Formulas

March 9, 2021

Mark Frost, MSTCM, L.Ac.

Spring Formulas

With spring just around the corner, it's time to get ready for more time outdoors! Along with warmer days, fresh green grass and blooming flowers, as clinicians it's time for us to prepare for our patients presenting with common seasonal sinus and nasal complaints. Mark Frost, L.Ac. compares 3 common spring formulas: Cang Er Zi San, Bi Yan Pian and Pe Min Kan Wan.

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Herbalist Corner - Cang Er Zi & Xin Yi Hua

March 1, 2021

Mark Frost, MSTCM, L.Ac.

Herbalist Corner Cang Er Zi and Xin Yi Hua

Mark Frost, Herbal Chair at American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine (ACTCM) joins highlights 2 important herbs for dispelling Wind Cold and Wind Heat and commonly used in Spring formulas. Cang Er Zi and Xin Yi Hua are compared including their TCM functions and how to select the best herbs for your patients.

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How Extract Powders are Made

March 1, 2021

Yvonne Lau, Mayway President

How Extracts Are Made

Curious about how Extract Powders are made? Wonder about the quality controls behind our formulas? Yvonne Lau, President of Mayway, talks all about Plum Flower Extract Powders!

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Deep Dive into Extract Powders & Granules

February 18, 2021

Skye Sturgeon, DAOM, L.Ac., Quality Assurance Manager, Mayway

Deep Dive on Extract Powders

Go deep into the nature of Plum Flower's Extract Powders, how they differ from granules, factors that affect yield of products, and read what 5:1 really means.

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Extract Powder Comparison Demonstration

February 16, 2021

Extract Powder quality comparison

See how the Plum Flower Extract Powder Formula "Jia Wei Xiao Yao San" compares to 5 other extract and granule brands in this quick product comparison video.

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Dosage Considerations of Extract Powders and Granules

February 8, 2021

Skye Sturgeon, DAOM, L.Ac., Quality Assurance Manager, Mayway

How Extracts Are Made

Our Herbal Consultants are often asked about recommendations for dosing extract powders. Skye Sturgeon, DAOM, L.Ac. discusses the history of herbal extract powders, dosage calculation examples, and learn how to create and tailor your own formulas!

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Novel Formulas for Releasing the Exterior

January 17, 2021

Skye Sturgeon, DAOM, L.Ac., Quality Assurance Manager, Mayway

Mayway DispensaryWe have added 17 new prescription templates for our practitioners to use for creating customized formulas for their patients. Several formulas were created by Michael McCulloch of the Pine Street Foundation as referenced during his 2020 webinar broadcast. Others were extracted from the National Health Commission of the PRC, Hubei Provincial Hospital, and Wuhan Union Hospital. We've provided an overview of these formulas and hope that they can be a guide for helping your patients during this crisis. Read More

Calm Spirit Soup Recipe

January 14, 2021

Yvonne Lau, Mayway President

Calm Spirit Soup

The TCM concept of “form complementing form, organ complementing organ” (yi xing bu xing, yi zang bu zang 以形補形、以臟補臟 ) is well known throughout Asian culture and cooking. For example, eating walnuts for brain tonification and cashews for the health of the kidneys, or drinking red wine to tonify the blood is common folk wisdom. In this recipe, we are honoring this concept by using pig's heart (Zhu xin 豬心) to nourish the heart.

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Cold Weather Kidney Tonics

January 1, 2021

Mark Frost, MSTCM, L.Ac.

Cold Weather Kidney Tonics Winter is upon us and the cold winds have begun to blow once again. This is an ideal time to strengthen and tonify the Kidneys in order to ensure the Yang Qi is warming the interior, channels and collaterals. The TCM functions of the Kidneys include storing the Essence, governing fluid metabolism in the lower burner and lower extremities, receiving the Qi from the Lungs, ruling the two lower orifices, regulating reproductive and sexual function, and housing the Life Gate (Ming Men – 命門) Fire. We review our top 3 cold weather kidney tonics and their use in Chinese medicine. Read More

Let’s Make Chinese Herbal Tonic Wines

December 28, 2020

Tonic Wines in Jars The first known mention of herbal tonic wine is from the Wu Shi Er Bing Fang (Prescriptions for 52 Ailments), which was unearthed at Ma Wang Dui tomb, an archaeological site located in Changsha, China. It is believed to have been written around 200 BC, although the prescriptions are thought to be much older.

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Yang Tonics Comparison

December 23, 2020

Yvonne Lau, Mayway President

Yang Tonics Comparison

Explore 7 Yang Tonics to help practitioners quickly and easily compare formulas, their functions, indications, and ingredients.

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Wind and Cold Damp Bi

December 16, 2020

Skye Sturgeon, DAOM, L.Ac., Quality Assurance Manager, Mayway

Wind and Cold Damp Bi

One of the most common reasons that patients seek treatment from licensed acupuncturists is for musculoskeletal aches and mild pain (Tòng 痛), both acute and chronic. There may also be decreased range of motion, inflammation, swelling, and numbness. Primarily, these issues are due to minor injury or dysfunction of joints and related soft tissues, including tendons and ligaments. In traditional Chinese medicine, this often is interpreted as Obstruction Syndrome (Bì zhèng 痺症).

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