Herbs & Formulas

History & Evolution of Liu Wei Di Huang Tang

March 10, 2020

Mark Frost, MSTCM, L.Ac.

Liu Wei Di HuangMarch is National Kidney Awareness Month, and while "kidney" means more than the physiological kidneys in TCM, we want to spotlight one of the most essential and popular kidney formulas in traditional Chinese Medicine: Liu Wei Di Huang Tang. This humble six-ingredient formula to tonify Liver & Kidney Yin, created by Qian Yi and recorded in his “Key to Therapeutics of Children's Diseases" 小儿药证直诀 around 900 years ago, forms the basis of a myriad of modifications. According to the folks at Lanzhou Foci (who make our Plum Flower® version), Liu Wei Di Huang Wan is the most popular classical TCM formula used in China today. Read More

Coronavirus: CE Course Modern Research from Traditional Chinese Medicine

March 8, 2020

Michael McCulloch, LAc MPH PhD

Michael McCullochIn this 2 hour continuing education distant learning course taught by Michael McCulloch, L.Ac., MPH, PhD Epidemiologist, we will review modern Traditional Chinese Medicine cold and flu research, herbs and the body's efforts to defend against the virus, herbs and foods and preventing the cytokine storm, primary care providers and infection control.

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Gan Mao Ling & Yin Chiao/Qiao – What’s the Difference?

November 26, 2019

Mayway Staff

Gan Mao Ling & Yin ChiaoMany practitioners wonder what the differences are between these two very popular formulas to prevent and treat common wind-heat invasion. One main difference is that Yin Qiao is exclusively for wind-heat invasion, whereas Gan Mao Ling, likely due to its ability to strengthen the immune system, can also be used for the initial stages of wind-cold. Therefore, Gan Mao Ling may be safely taken by a patient before a determination is made as to the etiology of an early stage wind invasion, as well as for short term prevention of a wind invasion. However, if Gan Mao Ling does not work in the first couple of days...

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Autumn Rain Teapills for Dry Cough

October 30, 2019

Mayway Staff

Autumn Rain TeapillsDr. Wu Ju-Tong created Sha Shen Mai Men Dong Wan as a variation of Mai Men Dong Tang with the intention of treating dry cough in the Autumn. It was first published in his Systematic Differentiation of Warm Disease⁄Wen Bing Tiao Bian in 1798. This classic formula treats injury due to dryness to the Lung and Stomach, which are very sensitive to both invasion by pathogenic dryness and excessive dryness of the air or diet. It gently replenishes lost moisture to the mucus membranes lining the Lung and Stomach to resolve occasional dry hacking cough and wheezing, as well as thirst, dry throat, mouth, lips and nasal passages...

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Tian Ma Teapills - A Good Perimenopausal Formula?

September 29, 2019

Mayway Staff

Tian Ma WanIn the modern clinic, Tian Ma Wan is often used for perimenopausal women with a mixed pattern of Liver and Kidney deficiency (Yin, Blood, possibly slight Yang Xu) and some combination of wind-damp Bi Zheng, episodes of Liver Yang rising and possibly the stirring of internal wind to the head. Key symptoms include occasional headaches and/or dizziness, neck, shoulder and upper back tension, hot flashes and facial/neck flushing, difficulty sleeping, irritability, as well as occasional pain, stiffness and spasm in various locations, but particularly the neck, shoulder, hip, low back and legs...

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Si Ni San Wan to Release Constraint

August 30, 2019

Mayway Staff

Si Ni San Wan

In the modern clinic, Si Ni San is used for Liver Qi stagnation patterns with cold extremities, stress, emotional upset and digestive disturbance. Key symptoms include digestive issues in a patient with cold hands and feet where the cold is usually limited to the fingers and toes and doesn’t extend past the wrists or ankles, symptoms are worsened by strong emotions and stress, and are accompanied by a wiry pulse and a red tongue.

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Zi Sheng Wan/Nourish Life Pills for a mixed excess and deficiency pattern of digestive upset

July 30, 2019

Mayway Staff

Zi Sheng Wan

The primary goal of Zi Sheng Wan is to strengthen Spleen Qi and specifically the Spleen's ability to transform food and transport fluids, thus invigorating digestive function and increasing the absorption of nutrients. Secondarily it eliminates the blockage of food stagnation and dampness that has accumulated in the Stomach and Intestines due to the improperly digested food, and clears heat or damp-heat that may have been generated from the chronic stagnation.

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Qing Wei Wan for Stomach Heat and Fire Uprising

July 1, 2019

Mayway Staff

Ba Ji Yin Yang

Qing Wei San was written by Li Dongyuan and published in his classic formula book, Lan Shi Mi Cang/Secrets from the Orchid Chamber, in 1336 A.D. Qing Wei San is indicated for Stomach heat and fire causing occasional toothache, and occasional mouth sores on the tongue and lips.

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Ba Ji Yin Yang Teapills to restore equilibrium of Yin and Yang

May 31, 2019

Mayway Staff

Ba Ji Yin Yang

As the name Ba Ji Yin Yang Wan implies, this “Yin Yang” formula featuring Ba Ji Tian restores the equilibrium of Yin and Yang to the body by warming Kidney Yang and the Ming Men fire while simultaneously preserving the Yin fluids that keep the fire in balance. Ba Ji Yin Yang Wan is specifically indicated for Kidney Yang deficiency leading to the instability of the lower jiao, resulting in the inability to store Jing-essence and contain or control body fluids.

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Women’s Voices in Traditional Chinese Medicine

May 27, 2019

Laura Stropes, L.Ac.

Women's Voices in TCM

We are celebrating women's health and the fabulous contributions that women are making in traditional Chinese medicine! Check out our interviews with Yvonne Charles of Charlotte Maxwell Clinic, Valerie Hobbs, L.Ac., specializing in women's health and former midwife, Susan Johnson, L.Ac., respected author and instructor of Master Tung's points, Sally Rappeport, L.Ac., acupuncturist and co-founder of the Shen Nong Society, and Ravyn Stanfield, Executive Director of Acupuncturists Without Borders.

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